Example football case studies

Our Small Grants fund can offer awards from £300 to £10,000 to help make your ideas happen

We prioritise projects working with people from lower socio-economic groups and that seek to address identified barriers to participation in football.

We will not fund capital items such as building work or fixed equipment such as goals. So if your football project is capital focused, please visit the Football Foundation website.

Examples of revenue project costs which we'll consider include sessional coaching/activation, venue hire and items of non-fixed equipment such as moveable goals.

To help give you an idea of the types of football projects we'll fund, below are two theoretical case studies of successful applicants.

Walking football

We appreciate the value that football can play in helping people to lead active lives. Walking football is one example of a great way to stay active in later life, as well as providing a route into the game for women and girls, people living with disabilities and people from low income backgrounds.  

We want to encourage more people to participate in football and hope that this example provides an idea of the type of project that we are looking to support through Small Grants funding.

Costs associated with delivering walking football sessions normally involve items such as hiring facilities (e.g. sports hall, part of a 3G pitch), fees linked to a coach/facilitator/project co-ordinator, equipment (such as balls and bibs), marketing and potentially transport/travel costs. These are all eligible project items under our Small Grants programme.

Example walking football project

After undertaking community engagement with their local community, a local football stakeholder or community organisation has identified an opportunity to deliver activity to new/lapsed players living in a deprived community locally. They're keen to deliver the activity in a sustainable way and to change people’s behaviour in the long term.

As part of their wish to understand demand for football locally, the football stakeholder undertook consultation with the local community and key community organisations. This identified, amongst other opportunities, the demand for activities from those aged 55+ who are seeking a low impact activity. These players expressed a wish for a fun, relaxed re-introduction to football delivered in a proper football setting (such as a 3G/sports hall) with line markings and goals with nets. The consultation also highlighted that the preference for the activity to be:

  • During the day
  • Once a week for an hour
  • Year-round
  • At a location no more than 15 minutes from home
  • Low cost
  • Organised by a project co-ordinator.

The applicant has scoped the project and broken down the estimated costs* as follows:

Items

Description

Estimated Amount

Coach/Activator costs

Project co-ordinator

£3,500

Equipment Purchase

Bibs, footballs, whistles, first aid kit, ball bags etc.  

£325

Hire of facilities

Facility hire at £20ph x 1-hour x 2 sessions per week x 48 weeks

£2,000

Promotion/publicity

Marketing materials, social media activity etc

£300

Transport/travel costs

Transportation for players to venue

£1,000

Estimated Total

 

£7,125

Good projects applying to Small Grants demonstrate how they've worked with the local community to shape the project and identify what things are most important to them. This might include the type of venue and location where the project will take place. Making use of consultation, focus groups or informal conversations with local people is a good way to understand this.

Other things to consider will include whether the project will need to pay for costs such as venue hire, equipment, promotion and travel. Also, it's worth thinking about whether anyone is needed to organise and/or deliver the sessions.   

*Please note that the costs set out in this case study are estimated costs. Each applicant will need to work out appropriate costs for their own scheme. The costs set out in this example should not be regarded as ‘approved’ costs.

Recreational football

We appreciate the value football can play in helping people to lead active lives. Recreational football is a great example of how to get active in a fun, accessible and inclusive way. It can provide a route into the game for those with limited previous experience and/or those wishing to re-engage with the sport.

We want to encourage more people to participate in football and hope that the example below provides an idea on the type of project we are looking to support under our Small Grants programme.

The costs associated with delivering recreational football sessions normally involve items such as coach/activator/project co-ordinator fees, equipment (such as balls and bibs), marketing and hiring facilities (e.g. sports hall, part of a 3G pitch). These are all eligible project costs under our Small Grants programme.

An example recreational football project

Having consulted with the local community, a local football stakeholder or community organisation has identified an opportunity to deliver activity involving new female players living in a deprived community. They're keen to deliver the activity in a sustainable way and to try and change people’s behaviour in the long term.  

The consultation identified that the players had expressed a wish for a more informal, friendly introduction to the game delivered in an accessible, less traditional football environment (e.g. a park). The consultation highlighted the preference for the activity to be delivered:

  • During the day
  • Once a week for an hour
  • Initially over a 12-week spring/summer period, but with the opportunity to extend the duration of the activity if it proved enjoyable
  • At a location no more than 15 minutes from home
  • Low cost.

Given the focus on seeking a fun, enjoyable experience, the consultation indicated the benefits of the sessions being delivered by an activator rather than a coach.

The aim is to start the activity in a park setting and then when lighting/weather becomes more of an issue, relocate to an indoor space that the players feel comfortable in.

The applicant has scoped the ongoing project and broken down the estimated costs* as follows:

Items

Description

Estimated Amount

Activator costs

Lead Activator - £25ph x 1-hour x 2 sessions x 48 weeks, plus expenses.

2nd Activator - £20ph x 1-hour x 2 sessions x 48 weeks, plus expenses

£5,184

Equipment Purchase

Bibs, footballs, whistles, first aid kit, ball bags etc. 

£325

Hire of facilities

Indoor Facility hire at £25ph x 1-hour x 2 sessions per week x 24 weeks

£1,200

Promotion/publicity

Marketing materials, social media activity etc

£300

Staff costs

Project co-ordinator

£2,000

Estimated Total

 

£9,009

Good projects applying to Small Grants can clearly demonstrate how they've worked with and listened to the local community to shape their project, understanding what is considered most important to them. This might include the type of venue and location as well as how the activity is to be delivered.

Other things to consider include how the project can become sustainable given the likely need to pay for costs such as venue hire, equipment and the fees for those delivering the sessions.

*Please note that the costs set out in this case study are estimated costs. Each applicant will need to work out appropriate costs for their own project. The costs set out in this example should not be regarded as ‘approved’ costs.